Skip to main content

Did Jesus Promote Violence or Shalom?



From the days of John the Baptist until now the Kingdom of Heaven
suffers violence, and the violent take it by force.
  
The English translation of the verse above has influenced Christian theologies and Western cultures for centuries. Some Christians have used it to promote violence as part of their mission. You can even find graphics of Jesus in military gear with an AK-47 urging people to use violence and force in Google searches. But for most Christians, the thought of Jesus promoting violence simply feels wrong. However, some of them also believe the English words of their Bible are the inerrant and infallible word of God -- God said it so that means it is true! It’s a crazy religious matrix that we live in. So, did Jesus actually say those words? Read the complete blog by clicking here.


Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Madison's Warnings About Creating Political Parties

While doing some research today I came across the "Federalists No. 10" written by James Madison on Thursday, November 22, 1787. Madison warned his readers about the dangers of the formation of political parties and allowing them to become involved in government. 
When the Constitution was written in 1787, the founders thought of political parties as "factions," acting only for their own selfish interests rather than the public good. The founders saw instances in history when factions resorted to assassination and civil war if they failed to get their way. The writers of the Constitution believed that political parties would play no formal role in the new government. The Constitution made no mention of them.

Even in electing the president, the founders assumed the absence of political parties. The Constitution established an Electoral College, which called for a small number of electors—elected or appointed in the states— to meet, deliberate, and choose the best perso…

Why did they lay their coats at Saul's feet?

The witnesses, laying their coats at the feet of Saul, were the men that would cast the first stones at Stephen in Acts 7. Why did they all lay their coats at Saul’s feet? The Talmud contains a very interesting account of the act of stoning that may provide the answer.
“When the trial was over, they take him [the condemned person] out to be stoned. The place of stoning was at a distance from the court, as it is said, ‘Take out the one who has cursed.’[i] A man stands at the entrance of the court; in his hand is a signaling flag [Hebrewsudarin = sudar, ‘scarf, sweater’]. A horseman was stationed far away but within sight of him. If one [of the judges] says, ‘I have something [more] to say in his favor,’ he [the signaler] waves thesudarin, and the horseman runs and stops them [from stoning him]. Even if [the condemned person] himself says, ‘I have something to say in my favor,’ they bring him back, even four of five times, only provided that there is some substance to what he is saying.…

Anchoring Beliefs to the Real World Instead of Just Arguing About Them

Beliefs are memes and memes only exist in the neural networks of brains. When people talk about their beliefs, they often do it as if their beliefs are facts that anyone can see. Facts are things that can be sensory perceived by anyone.
● The Statue of Liberty and the Rocky Mountains exist. That’s a fact. They can be sensory perceived (seen, felt, smelled, tasted) by a group of people with very different belief systems.
● The Trinity and Original Sin are beliefs. They cannot be sensory perceived (seen, felt, smelled, tasted). They are not real for people with different belief systems.
In order to view beliefs in the evolutionary contexts required to evaluate them, we must anchor them to the world outside the brain. We do this by anchoring them to times, places and people. This is very useful and scientists do with facts all of the time. Below is an example using the Statue of Liberty.
● mid.1865 – In an after dinner conversation, Édouard René de Laboulaye, president of the French Anti-S…